Defending Liberty: The Case for a New Bill of Rights


An ISR Business & the political-legal environment study


DEFENDING LIBERTY: THE CASE FOR A NEW BILL OF RIGHTS

CONTENTS

1. Defending liberty through a new Bill of Rights

2. Existing rights laws in Britain

3. Constitutional limits on power in America

4. European rights codes

5. Economic rights and freedoms

6. Political rights and freedoms

7. Judicial rights and freedoms

8. Communication rights and freedoms

9. Personal rights and freedoms

Further reading


Basic laws limiting state power and preventing governments from attacking instead of defending the lives, liberties and properties of the people have existed for centuries.  However, some serious official infringements of liberty, democracy and the rule of law have occurred of late.  

This book details the case for a new Bill of Rights to protect basic economic, political and judicial, communication and personal rights and freedoms more effectively today.    

A comprehensive and up-to-date Bill of Rights would ban a far wider range of official actions than the original British and American rights bills.   It would also ensure independent courts had the power to nullify government laws and policies violating its terms.

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Price & specifications:


E-book

First published 2019

Print length 226 pages

Price $9.99 USD

 


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Synoptic contents

1. Defending liberty through a new Bill of Rights

Introduction

An indigenous new bill

Avoiding judicial politicking

Curbing major and minor abuses

Prohibiting governments rather than permitting citizens

Restoring and extending democracy

The existing British and American rights bills:  the best models for an effective new UK bill

Enforcing a new Bill of Rights 

Defending liberty, not increasing coercion

A comprehensive new bill

An adaptable and updateable new bill

References    

2. Existing rights laws in Britain

Magna Carta

The impact of Magna Carta

The Glorious Revolution and Bill of Rights of 1688-89

John Locke on the limits of government power

Common law protections

The Human Rights and Civil Contingencies acts

The Protection of Freedoms Act

The Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act

The Modern Slavery Act 

Conclusions

References

3. Constitutional limits on power in America

Introduction

The US constitution and Bill of Rights

Contrasts with Britain

Violations of the US constitution and Bill of Rights

Causes of rights violations

Restoring liberty, democracy and the rule of law

References

4. European rights codes

Introduction

The European Convention on Human Rights

Criticisms of the convention

The Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union

Criticisms of the EU charter

Conclusions

References

5. Economic rights and freedoms

Introduction  

Economic freedom and national wealth

The link between economic and political freedom

Freedom of contract and the rule of law

Economic freedom and communication

Economic freedom and the individual

Existing basic legal protections of economic rights in Britain  

Economic rights and liberties under the US Constitution

Economic rights and freedoms in Europe

Enlarging and extending economic freedom under a new British Bill of Rights

Separating industry and commerce from government

Maintaining free trade and markets

Defending property

Guaranteeing labour market and employment freedom

Outlawing government wage controls

Outlawing official discrimination and mistreatment of business-economic minorities

Blocking damaging fiscal and monetary policies 

References

6. Political rights and freedoms

Introduction

The importance of political rights and freedoms

Existing basic legal protections of political rights and freedoms in Britain

Losing national political self-determination

The growth of bureaucratic tyranny

Restoring and extending political freedom and democracy through a new Bill of Rights

References

7. Judicial rights and freedoms

Introduction

The importance of the rule of law

Existing basic legal guarantees of judicial rights in Britain

Institutional safeguards of judicial independence

Extending judicial rights through a new Bill of Rights

UK regulatory bureaucracies   

Bureaucratic business regulation versus the rule of law

Banning state regulatory bureaucracy under a new Bill of Rights  

References

8. Communication rights and freedoms

Introduction  

Basic legal protection of communication rights in America

Communication rights protection in Europe

Freedom of economic communication

Freedom of political communication

The judiciary and freedom of communication

Defending freedom of the press under a new Bill of Rights

Freedom of international communication: the importance of an open web   

Freedom of religion and secular culture 

Freedom of education: John Stuart Mill on the dangers of state ownership and control of schools

Freedom of opinion and expression

References

9. Personal rights and freedoms

Introduction

Personal freedom and its protection in modern Britain (1): positives

Personal freedom and its protection in modern Britain (2): negatives

Personal economic rights and freedoms  

Personal political rights and freedoms  

Personal judicial rights and freedoms

Personal communication rights and freedoms  

References

Further reading


Copyright © Industrial Systems Research. All rights reserved.


Further reading from Industrial Systems Research:

British Democracy: Its Restoration & Extension 

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Two Treatises on Government: A Translation into Modern English

  JPEG Thumbnail Two Treatises on Government

On Liberty: A Translation into Modern English

  JPEG Thumbnail On Liberty

ISR Publications Catalogue

 Hardcover picture1  


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